BOSNIANISM




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| Bosnianism | Croatian_nationalism | Serbian_nationalism | Yugoslavism | Slavic_nationalism | Montenegrin_nationalism | Bosnia | Austrian_nationalism | Bosnian_War | Bosniaks | Bosnia_and_Herzegovina_national_football_team | Bosnia_(region) | Bosnians | History_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina | Bosnia_Eyalet | Kingdom_of_Bosnia | Federation_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina | Austro-Hungarian_rule_in_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina | Province_of_Bosnia | Socialist_Republic_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina |

  1. BOSLang - Bosnian Translation Services - Translation from English to Bosnian.
  2. Bosnian Church - An indigenous church of Bosnia which existed in the Middle Ages. The article argues that the Bosnian Church was orthodox if autonomous and not infected by the Bogomil heresy.
  3. The Bosnian Pyramid - The first possible pyramid in Europe found in Bosnia. Join the community in English and get daily updated news, photos, videos and discussions.
  4. Kulenovic - History of Kulenovic family from Venice. Bilingual, English and Bosnian.
  5. Bosnian Support Fund - Registered charity, aiming to help people left homeless during the Bosnian conflict. Message board, case studies, news and details of how you can help.
  6. The Bosnian Manuscript Ingathering Project - Initiative for gathering old Bosnian manuscripts of the Oriental Institute in Sarajevo.
  7. Bosnian Institute - The Bosnian Institute (a UK charity) provides education and information on the history and culture of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
  8. Bosanska Kraljevska Porodica - The Bosnian Royal Family - Internet Vortal Bosanske Kraljevske Porodice Omerbasic Berislavic Nemanjic Boricevic - Internet Vortal od The Bosnian Royal Family Omerbashich Berislavich Nemanich Boritchevich
  9. Bosnia and Herzegovina - The Communication Regulatory Agency (CRA) - Telecoms and broadcast regulator for Bosnia and Herzegovina. Was set up by the UN High Representative in the country. The site is available in English, Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian.
  10. Bosnian Football Culture - "Essays on Football from Bosnia and Herzegovina" are written by an anthropologist who conducted an ethnographical fieldwork in Bosnia for one year.
  11. KK Bosna - Features team roster, coaching staff, history, and contacts. Based in Bosnia and Herzegovina and member of the Goodyear League / Adriatic Basketball Association. English and Bosnian language options.
  12. Datoteka English-Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Dictionary - Look up individual words, including many specialized technical terms.
  13. Cizmic, Ekrem - Bosnian painter.
  14. Cizmic, Seyo - Bosnian artist now living in California and focusing on the human condition. Includes galleries of his paintings and drawings.
  15. Babic, Danijel - Featuring the drawings, illustrations, comic portraits and acrylic paintings of a Bosnian artist.
  16. Hodak, Boris - Paintings and photocollage, described as neo-surrealism, are presented by this Bosnian artist. Focus is on the female form.
  17. Astrology - Site with a lot of information about planets and their influence. Horoscope updated every week. English and Bosnian.
  18. Bosnian Institute - Provides education and information on the history and culture of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
  19. Stolac.info - Articles, historical background and photo galleries for the town located near Mostar. [English/Bosnian]
  20. E & A - Virtual gallery of graphic prints of Mersard Berber, famous Bosnian artist.


  21. [ Link Deletion Request ]



    Bosnianism


    The flag of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1992 to 1998. This is a common symbol of Bosnianism, especially used by nationalist Bosniaks. Though the flag largely became a symbol of the Muslim Bosniaks during the Bosnian War, it uses the coat of the King Tvrtko I of the historic Kingdom of Bosnia.
    Catholic Church (left), Mosque (centre, background), and Serbian Orthodox Church (right) in Bosanska Krupa.

    Bosnianism (Bosanstvo) refers to the nationalism or patriotism of Bosnians and the culture of Bosnia and Herzegovina.[1] It has existed in a variety of forms, including one form that promotes a Bosnian identity that includes Bosniaks, Croats, and Serbs within it, and another version that views Bosnia and Herzegovina as the homeland of Bosniaks.[2]


    Bosnianism History


    The concept of a Bosniak identity that includes all religions presented in Bosnia and Herzegovina can be traced back to medivial Kingdom of Bosnia and Ottoman empire. It was also favoured during Austro-Hungarian Austro-Hungarian governor of Bosnia, Benjamin Kallay who promoted a multiethnic Bosniak identity for Muslims, Catholics and Orthodoxes; this was promoted by Austria-Hungary as a mean to defend the territorial integrity of Bosnia and Herzegovina that was threatened by Croat and Serb irredentism.[2] Early efforts in the late 19th to early 20th century to expand Bosnian identity beyond Muslims to the Catholics and Orthodox Christians failed and primarily became a nationalism of the Bosnian Muslims.[2]

    The failure of Austro-Hungarian intentions to promote a Bosniak identity amongst Catholics and Orthodoxes, resulted in only Bosnian Muslims adhering to Bosniak identity, and thus Bosniakism was adopted as a Bosnian Muslim ethnic nationalism by nationalist figures.[3] Beginning in 1891, Mehmed-beg Kapetanović declared that Bosnian Muslims were neither Croats nor Serbs but a distinct, though related people.[4] Kapetanović in an article of the journal Bosnjak (The Bosniak), declared the following:.[5]

    Whereas the Croats argue that the Orthodox are our greatest enemies and that Serbdom is the same as Orthodoxy, the Serbs wear themselves out calling our attention to some bogus history, by which they have Serbianized the whole world. We shall never deny that we belong to the South Slav family; but we shall remain Bosniaks, like our forefathers, and nothing else.[6]

    — Mehmed-beg Kapetanović

    Upon the founding of Yugoslavia in 1918, Yugoslav unitarists claimed that there was only one single Yugoslav nation and that the Croats, Serbs, and Slovenes were recognized as the "tribes" of the Yugoslavs, this excluded recognition of Bosniaks as a distinct people of Yugoslavia and provoked frustration amongst Bosniaks.[2] In response to a lack of recognition, the Yugoslav Muslim Organization (JMO) was founded in 1919 with support of most Bosniaks and other Slavic Muslims in entire region, including the Muslim intelligentsia and social elite, that sought to defend Bosniak and Muslim identity - including religious, social, and economic rights within Bosnia and Herzegovina.[2] The JMO took part in government briefly in 1928 and then longer from 1935 to 1938 in which it participated in government with the goal of preserving the territorial integrity of Bosnia and Herzegovina in opposition to plans to create an autonomous Croatia that held territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina.[2] The JMO's efforts to prevent the partition of Bosnia and Herzegovina failed and the Banate of Croatia was created in 1939.[7]

    Bosniak nationalism received a severe setback during World War II when Yugoslavia was invaded by the Axis Powers and Bosnia and Herzegovina was annexed by the Independent State of Croatia (NDH) that regarded the Bosniaks as "Muslim Croats".[7] By late 1941, much of the Bosniak elite openly criticized the NDH regime for its policy toward its minorities, and demanded autonomy for Bosnia and Herzegovina.[7]

    With the creation of communist Yugoslavia in 1945, Bosnia and Herzegovina was restored as a territorial entity and as one of the six constituent republics of the federal state of Yugoslavia.[7] To resolve the Serb-Croat dispute over Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Yugoslav government in 1971 recognized Bosnian Muslims as a nationality.[7]

    Bosniak nationalism rose in strength since the 1980s, especially following Alija Izetbegović's publishing of the Islamic Declaration that called for an Islamic renewal amongst Bosniaks, Izetbegović was arrested by Yugoslav state authorities in 1983 on allegations that he was promoting a purely Muslim Bosnia, and served five years in prison.[7] In 1990, Izetbegović and others founded the Party of Democratic Action, that became the main Bosniak party in the Bosnian parliament.[7] The eruption of the Bosnian War from 1992 to 1995 strengthened Bosnian Muslim identity.[7] In 1993, the identity of "Bosnian Muslims" was changed to "Bosniaks".[7] In general Bosniak nationalism in the past and present has largely been based upon a focus to preserve Bosnia and Herzegovina's territorial integrity and to preserve Bosniaks' national rights.[7]


    Bosnianism References


    1. ^ Jack David Eller. From culture to ethnicity to conflict: an anthropological perspective on international ethnic conflict. University of Michigan Press, 1999. Pp. 262.
    2. ^ a b c d e f Motyl 2001, pp. 56.
    3. ^ Jack David Eller. From culture to ethnicity to conflict: an anthropological perspective on international ethnic conflict. University of Michigan Press, 1999. Pp. 262.
    4. ^ Jack David Eller. From culture to ethnicity to conflict: an anthropological perspective on international ethnic conflict. University of Michigan Press, 1999. Pp. 263.
    5. ^ Jack David Eller. From culture to ethnicity to conflict: an anthropological perspective on international ethnic conflict. University of Michigan Press, 1999. Pp. 263.
    6. ^ Jack David Eller. From culture to ethnicity to conflict: an anthropological perspective on international ethnic conflict. University of Michigan Press, 1999. Pp. 263.
    7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Motyl 2001, pp. 57.

    Bosnianism Bibliography



    Bosnianism See also




    | Bosnianism | Croatian_nationalism | Serbian_nationalism | Yugoslavism | Slavic_nationalism | Montenegrin_nationalism | Bosnia | Austrian_nationalism | Bosnian_War | Bosniaks | Bosnia_and_Herzegovina_national_football_team | Bosnia_(region) | Bosnians | History_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina | Bosnia_Eyalet | Kingdom_of_Bosnia | Federation_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina | Austro-Hungarian_rule_in_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina | Province_of_Bosnia | Socialist_Republic_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina

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