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COUNTRIES OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

UK Countries List Countries within the UK United Kingdom Country Code Is United Kingdom England United Kingdom Country Information Kingdom of the United States Commonwealth of United Kingdom Great Britain or United Kingdom




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  1. Duncombe Park - Baroque mansion set in several hundred acres of parkland. Information for visitors and teachers.
  2. Yahoo! Sports Groups - Cricket: Scotland - Directory of cricket clubs and fan groups which include message forums, chats, newsletters and photo galleries.
  3. Yahoo! Sports Groups - Cricket: England - Directory of cricket clubs and fan groups which include message forums, chats, newsletters and photo galleries.
  4. Yahoo! Groups: Newcastle United - The main index listing all the groups for Newcastle.
  5. Yahoo! Groups - A list of Yahoo! Groups for Catholics in the United Kingdom.
  6. Amnesty International USA - United Kingdom Human Rights - News, reports and success stories for the country including AI Annual Report entries for the past ten years.
  7. Hammerwood Park - The Greek Revival house near East Grinstead was built in 1792 to the designs of Benjamin Latrobe. Scholarly history by Michael Trinder and a virtual guided tour.
  8. Blenheim Palace - This baroque masterpiece - a World Heritage site - was built (1705-22) for the 1st Duke of Marlborough to designs by John Vanbrugh. The official site supplies an illustrated history and visitor information.
  9. Grimsthorpe Castle and Gardens - The official site for this stately home in Lincolnshire, remodelled in 1715 to the design of Sir John Vanbrugh. Includes a few images and very brief history, amid the visitor information.
  10. Castle Howard - One of England's grandest Baroque mansions, designed for Charles Howard, 3rd Earl of Carlisle, by John Vanbrugh and Nicholas Hawksmoor. History, images, news and visitor information.
  11. Harlaxton Manor - The most attractive and interesting work of the Victorian architect Anthony Salvin. Designed in the Elizabethan and Jacobean style. This site from the current owners, Harlaxton College, gives a good history of the building.
  12. Lulworth Castle - Official web-site of this early 17th-century mock-castle in Dorset, gutted by fire in 1929 but partly restored and open to the public.
  13. Belchamp Hall - The official site of this Queen Anne period family home in Suffolk has photographs, some history, and description of facilities offered.
  14. Hudson's Historic Houses and Gardens - The publishers of the guide to heritage properties in Great Britain and Ireland maintain this directory of links to web-sites of historic houses and gardens.
  15. Sutton Park - The official site of an early Georgian house in Yorkshire gives a history, photographic tour and visitor information.
  16. Scotland's Castles and Historic Houses - Articles, with photographs and plans, on Traquair, Mary Queen of Scots House, Linlithgow Palace, Hermitage Castle, Castle Urquhart, Crichton Castle, Strome Castle, Threave Castle and Caerlaverock Castle, from Scotland HolidayNet.
  17. The Prebendal Manor, Nassington - This 13th-century house is a rare survival. Photographs, scholarly history, archaeological finds, description of the recreated medieval garden, visitor information, events.
  18. Coleton Fishacre - Article by Jane Johnson in Britannia on this Art Deco mansion in South Devon built in 1926 to the designs of Oswald Milne (1881-1967), assistant to Lutyens. Photographs, history and visitor information.
  19. English Country Houses - Britannia's collection of illustrated articles: regional studies and the histories of specific houses.
  20. Beaulieu Palace House - Formerly the Great Gatehouse of Beaulieu Abbey, Palace House has been home to the Montagu family since 1538. The official site offers photographs and visitor information.


  21. [ Link Deletion Request ]



    Countries of the United Kingdom


    Map showing the four countries of the United Kingdom

    Countries of the United Kingdom is a term that can be used to describe England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales: the four parts of the United Kingdom.[1][2][dead link] Prior to 1922, the entire island of Ireland rather than just Northern Ireland was one of the countries. The alternative term Home Nations is also used, although today this is mainly in sporting contexts and may still include all of the island of Ireland.

    The United Kingdom, a sovereign state under international law, is a member of intergovernmental organisations, the European Union and the United Nations. England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales are not themselves listed in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) list of countries. However the ISO list of the subdivisions of the UK is supplied by British Standards and the Office for National Statistics and so uses "country" to describe England, Scotland and Wales.[3] Northern Ireland, in contrast, is described as a "province" in the same lists.[3] The Parliament of the United Kingdom and Government of the United Kingdom deal with all reserved matters for Northern Ireland and Scotland and all non-transferred matters for Wales, but not in general matters that have been devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly, Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales. Additionally, devolution in Northern Ireland is conditional on co-operation between the Northern Ireland Executive and the Government of Ireland (see North/South Ministerial Council). The Government of the United Kingdom also consults with the Government of Ireland to reach agreement on some non-devolved matters for Northern Ireland (see British-Irish Intergovernmental Conference). England remains the full responsibility of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which is centralised in London.

    England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales each have separate national governing bodies for sports and compete separately in many international sporting competitions, including the Commonwealth Games. Northern Ireland also forms joint All-Island sporting bodies with the Republic of Ireland for some sports, such as rugby union.[4]

    The Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are dependencies of the British Crown but not part of the UK or of the European Union. Collectively, the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are referred to in UK law as the British Islands. Similarly, the British overseas territories, remnants of the British Empire scattered around the globe, are not constitutionally part of the UK. Formerly, the whole of Ireland was a country of the United Kingdom. The Republic of Ireland is the sovereign state formed from the portion of Ireland that seceded from the United Kingdom in 1922. Although part of the geographical British Isles,[5] the Republic of Ireland is not part of the United Kingdom and has not been a Commonwealth realm since April 1949.


    Countries of the United Kingdom Key facts



    Name
    Flag Area
    (km²)
    Population
    (2010 estimate)

    Capital
    Devolved
    legislature
    Legal
    system
    England Flag of England.svg 130,395 51.6 million London No English law
    Scotland Flag of Scotland.svg 78,772 5.3 million Edinburgh Yes Scots law
    Wales Flag of Wales 2.svg 20,779 3.2 million Cardiff Yes English law and Contemporary Welsh law
    Northern Ireland No flag 13,843 1.8 million Belfast Yes Northern Ireland law and Irish land law
    United Kingdom Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 243,789 61.9 million London

    Countries of the United Kingdom Terminology


    Various terms have been used to describe England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.


    Countries of the United Kingdom Acts of Parliament

    Documents relevant to personal
    and legislative unions of the
    countries of the United Kingdom
    Treaty of Windsor 1175
    Treaty of York 1237
    Treaty of Perth 1266
    Treaty of Montgomery 1267
    Treaty of Aberconwy 1277
    Statute of Rhuddlan 1284
    Treaty of Edinburgh–N'hampton 1328
    Treaty of Berwick 1357
    Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542
    Crown of Ireland Act 1542
    Treaty of Edinburgh 1560
    Union of the Crowns 1603
    Union of England and Scotland Act 1603
    Act of Settlement 1701
    Act of Security 1704
    Alien Act 1705
    Treaty of Union 1706
    Acts of Union 1707
    Wales and Berwick Act 1746
    Irish Constitution 1782
    Acts of Union 1800
    Government of Ireland Act 1920
    Anglo-Irish Treaty 1921
    Royal and Parliamentary Titles 1927
    Ireland Act 1949
    N. Ireland (Temporary Provisions) 1972
    N. Ireland Assembly Act 1973
    N. Ireland Constitution Act 1973
    Northern Ireland Act 1998
    Government of Wales Act 1998
    Scotland Act 1998
    Government of Wales Act 2006
    Scotland Act 2012
    Edinburgh Agreement 2012
    • The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 annexed the legal system of Wales to England[6] to create the single entity commonly known for centuries simply as England, but later[citation needed] officially renamed England and Wales. Wales was described (in varying combinations) as the "Country", "Principality", and "Dominion" of Wales.[6][7] Outside of Wales, England was not given a specific name or term. The Laws in Wales Acts have subsequently been repealed.[8][9]
    • The Acts of Union 1707 refer to both England and Scotland as a "Part of the united Kingdom"[10]
    • The Acts of Union 1800 use "Part" in the same way. They also use "Country" to describe Great Britain and Ireland respectively, when describing trade between them[11]
    • The Government of Ireland Act 1920 does not use any term or description to classify Northern Ireland nor indeed Great Britain.

    Current legal terminology

    The Interpretation Act 1978 provides statutory definitions of the terms 'England', 'Wales' and 'the United Kingdom', but neither that Act nor any other current statute defines 'Scotland' or 'Northern Ireland'. Use of the first three terms in other legislation is interpreted following the definitions in the 1978 Act. The definitions in the 1978 Act are listed below:

    • "England" means, subject to any alteration of boundaries under Part IV of the Local Government Act 1972, the area consisting of the counties established by section 1 of that Act, Greater London and the Isles of Scilly. " This definition applies from 1 April 1974.
    • "United Kingdom" means "Great Britain and Northern Ireland. " This definition applies from 12 April 1927.

    In the Scotland Act 1998 there is no delineation of Scotland, with the definition in section 126 simply providing that Scotland includes "so much of the internal waters and territorial sea of the United Kingdom as are adjacent to Scotland".[citation needed]

    The Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011 refers to England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as "parts" of the United Kingdom in the following clause: "Each constituency shall be wholly in one of the four parts of the United Kingdom (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). "

    "Regions": For purposes of NUTS 1 collection of statistical data in a format that is compatible with similar data that is collected elsewhere in the European Union, the United Kingdom has been divided into twelve regions of approximately equal size.[12] Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are regions in their own right while England has been divided into nine regions.

    The official term rest of the UK (RUK or rUK) is used in Scotland, for example in export statistics[13] and in legislating for student funding.[14]


    Countries of the United Kingdom Identity and nationality


    According to the British Social Attitudes Survey, there are broadly two interpretations of British identity, with ethnic and civic dimensions:

    The first group, which we term the ethnic dimension, contained the items about birthplace, ancestry, living in Britain, and sharing British customs and traditions. The second, or civic group, contained the items about feeling British, respecting laws and institutions, speaking English, and having British citizenship.[15]

    Of the two perspectives of British identity, the civic definition has become the dominant idea and in this capacity, Britishness is sometimes considered an institutional or overarching state identity.[16][17] This has been used to explain why first-, second- and third-generation immigrants are more likely to describe themselves as British, rather than English, Scottish or Welsh, because it is an "institutional, inclusive" identity, that can be acquired through naturalisation and British nationality law; the vast majority of people in the United Kingdom who are from an ethnic minority feel British.[18] However, this attitude is more common in England than in Scotland or Wales; "white English people perceived themselves as English first and as British second, and most people from ethnic minority backgrounds perceived themselves as British, but none identified as English, a label they associated exclusively with white people".[citation needed] Contrariwise, in Scotland and Wales "there was a much stronger identification with each country than with Britain. "[19]

    Studies and surveys have reported that the majority of the Scots and Welsh see themselves as both Scottish/Welsh and British though with some differences in emphasis. The Commission for Racial Equality found that with respect to notions of nationality in Britain, "the most basic, objective and uncontroversial conception of the British people is one that includes the English, the Scots and the Welsh".[20] However, "English participants tended to think of themselves as indistinguishably English or British, while both Scottish and Welsh participants identified themselves much more readily as Scottish or Welsh than as British".[20] Some persons opted "to combine both identities" as "they felt Scottish or Welsh, but held a British passport and were therefore British", whereas others saw themselves as exclusively Scottish or exclusively Welsh and "felt quite divorced from the British, whom they saw as the English".[20] Commentators have described this latter phenomenon as "nationalism", a rejection of British identity because some Scots and Welsh interpret it as "cultural imperialism imposed" upon the United Kingdom by "English ruling elites",[21] or else a response to a historical misappropriation of equating the word "English" with "British",[22] which has "brought about a desire among Scots, Welsh and Irish to learn more about their heritage and distinguish themselves from the broader British identity".[23] The propensity for nationalistic feeling varies greatly across the UK, and can rise and fall over time.[24]

    The state-funded Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey,[25] running since 1998 as part of a joint project between the University of Ulster and Queen's University Belfast, addressed the issue of identity in 2009. It reported that 35% of people identified as British, whilst 32% identified as Irish and 27% identified as Northern Irish. 2% opted to identify themselves as Ulster, whereas 4% stated other. Of the two main religious groups, 63% of Protestants identified as British as did 6% of Catholics; 66% of Catholics identified as Irish as did 3% of Protestants. 29% of Protestants and 23% of Catholics identified as Northern Irish.[26]

    Following devolution and the significant broadening of autonomous governance throughout the UK in the late 1990s, debate has taken place across the United Kingdom on the relative value of full independence.[27]


    Countries of the United Kingdom Competitions


    England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales each have separate national governing bodies for sports and compete separately in many international sporting competitions.[28][29][30][31] Each country of the United Kingdom has a national football team, and competes as a separate national team at the various disciplines in the Commonwealth Games.[32] At the Olympic Games, the United Kingdom is represented by the Great Britain and Northern Ireland team, although athletes from Northern Ireland can choose to join the Republic of Ireland's Olympic team.[32][33] Also in addition to Northern Ireland having its own national governing bodies for some sports such as Association football and Netball, for others, such as rugby union and cricket, Northern Ireland also participates with the Republic of Ireland in a joint All-Island team. England and Wales also field a joint cricket team.

    The United Kingdom also competes in the Eurovision Song Contest as the United Kingdom, as it does at the Olympic Games.


    Countries of the United Kingdom See also



    Countries of the United Kingdom References



    Countries of the United Kingdom Notes

    1. ^ Are Scotland, England, Wales, or Northern Ireland independent countries? About.com geography
    2. ^ UK Cabinet Office: Devolution Glossary (Accessed 7 September 2010): "United Kingdom: Term used most frequently for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the modern sovereign state comprising England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland."
    3. ^ a b ISO Newsletter ii-3-2011-12-13
    4. ^ http://www.sportni.net/PerformanceSport/Governing+Bodies
    5. ^ Gallagher 2006, p. 7
    6. ^ a b Laws in Wales Act 1535, Clause I
    7. ^ Laws in Wales Act 1542
    8. ^ Laws in Wales Act 1535 (repealed 21.12.1993)
    9. ^ Laws in Wales Act 1542 (repealed)
    10. ^ e. g. "... to be raised in that Part of the united Kingdom now called England", "...that Part of the united Kingdom now called Scotland, shall be charged by the same Act..." Article IX
    11. ^ e. g. "That, from the first Day of January one thousand eight hundred and one, all Prohibitions and Bounties on the Export of Articles, the Growth, Produce, or Manufacture of either Country, to the other, shall cease and determine; and that the said Articles shall thenceforth be exported from one Country to the other, without Duty or Bounty on such Export"; Union with Ireland Act 1800, Article Sixth.
    12. ^ "Regulation (EC) No 1059/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council of the European Union of 26 May 2003 on the establishment of a common classification of territorial units for statistics (NUTS)". The European Parliament and the Council of the European Union. Retrieved 2010–12–22. 
    13. ^ "RUK exports". Scottish Government. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
    14. ^ "Response to Scottish Government proposals for RUK fees". Edinburgh University Students' Association. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
    15. ^ Park 2005, p. 153.
    16. ^ Langlands, Rebecca (1999). "Britishness or Englishness? The Historical Problem of National Identity in Britain". Nations and Nationalism 5: 53–69. doi:10.1111/j.1354-5078.1999.00053.x 
    17. ^ Bradley, Ian C. (2007). Believing in Britain: The Spiritual Identity of 'Britishness'. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 978-1-84511-326-1 
    18. ^ Frith, Maxine (2004-01-08). "Ethnic minorities feel strong sense of identity with Britain, report reveals". The Independent (London: independent.co.uk). Retrieved 2009-07-07 
    19. ^ Commission for Racial Equality 2005, p. 35
    20. ^ a b c Commission for Racial Equality 2005, p. 22
    21. ^ Ward 2004, pp. 2–3.
    22. ^ Kumar, Krishan (2003). "The Making of English National Identity" (PDF). assets. cambridge.org. Retrieved 2009-06-05 
    23. ^ "The English: Europe's lost tribe". BBC News (news.bbc.co.uk). 1999-01-14. Retrieved 2009-06-05 
    24. ^ "Devolution, Public Attitudes and National Identity". www. devolution.ac.uk.  "The rise of the Little Englanders". London: The Guardian, John Carvel, social affairs editor. 28 November 2000. Retrieved 30 April 2010. 
    25. ^ "Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey home page". University of Ulster and Queen's University Belfast. Retrieved 2011-05-08. 
    26. ^ "Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey 2009, national identity module". University of Ulster and Queen's University Belfast. Retrieved 2011-05-08. 
    27. ^ "Devolution and Britishness". Devolution and Constitutional Change. UK's Economic and Social Research Council. 
    28. ^ "Sport England". Sport England website. Sport England. 2013. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
    29. Sport Northern Irreland. 2013. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
    30. ^ "Sportscotland". Sportscotland website. Sportscotland. 2013. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
    31. ^ "Sport Wales". Sport Wales website. Sport Wales. 2013. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
    32. ^ a b World and Its Peoples, Terrytown (NY): Marshall Cavendish Corporation, 2010, p. 111, "In most sports, except soccer, Northern Ireland participates with the Republic of Ireland in a combined All-Ireland team." 
    33. ^ "Irish and GB in Olympic Row". BBC Sport. 27 January 2004. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 

    Countries of the United Kingdom Bibliography



    UK Countries List Countries within the UK United Kingdom Country Code Is United Kingdom England United Kingdom Country Information Kingdom of the United States Commonwealth of United Kingdom Great Britain or United Kingdom

    | UK Countries List | Countries within the UK | United Kingdom Country Code | Is United Kingdom England | United Kingdom Country Information | Kingdom of the United States | Commonwealth of United Kingdom | Great Britain or United Kingdom | Countries_of_the_United_Kingdom | Area_of_the_countries_of_the_United_Kingdom | List_of_country_houses_in_the_United_Kingdom | Population_of_the_countries_of_the_United_Kingdom | Countries_of_the_United_Kingdom_by_GVA_per_capita | Scotland | Wales,_United_Kingdom | England,_United_Kingdom | United_Kingdom | Devolution | Parliament_of_the_United_Kingdom | United_Kingdom_in_the_Eurovision_Song_Contest | Town_and_country_planning_in_the_United_Kingdom | List_of_countries_that_have_gained_independence_from_the_United_Kingdom | Northern_Ireland,_United_Kingdom | French_language | England_and_Wales | Education_in_the_United_Kingdom | Football_in_the_United_Kingdom | Constituent_Countries_(United_Kingdom)

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