TURKISH STRAITS

Dardanelles Straits Black Sea Straits Straits of Bosphorus Bosporus and Dardanelles Straits Dardanelles and Bosporus What Do the Dardanelles Connect Turkish Straits Crisis Turkish Strait Disambig




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| Dardanelles Straits | Black Sea Straits | Straits of Bosphorus | Bosporus and Dardanelles Straits | Dardanelles and Bosporus | What Do the Dardanelles Connect | Turkish Straits Crisis | Turkish Strait Disambig |

| Turkish_Straits | Turkish_Straits_crisis | List_of_maritime_incidents_in_the_Turkish_Straits | Montreux_Convention_Regarding_the_Regime_of_the_Turkish_Straits | Turkey | Dardanelles_Straits | Black_Sea | Bosphorous_straits | Sea_of_Marmara | Gallipoli | Turkish_Navy | London_Straits_Convention | Greek-Turkish_Assistance_Act_of_1948 | Russian_naval_facility_in_Tartus | Pan-European_Oil_Pipeline | Lodos | Second_Cairo_Conference | Directorate_General_of_Coastal_Safety | Montreux_(disambiguation) |

  1. Turkish Maritime Pilots Association - Providing information on Turkish Straits and the safety of maritime transportation.


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    turkish straits map turkish straits passages turkish straits crisis turkish straits regulations turkish straits vessel traffic service montreux convention regarding the regime of the turkish straits turkish straits bosporus map of turkish straits



    Turkish Straits


    The Bosphorus (red) and the Dardanelles (yellow) are known collectively as the Turkish Straits.
    Aerial view of the Bosphorus from north (bottom) to south (top)

    The term Turkish Straits (Turkish: Türk Boğazları) refers to the two narrow straits in northwestern Turkey, the Bosphorus and the Dardanelles, that connect the Sea of Marmara with the Black Sea on one side and the Aegean arm of the Mediterranean Sea on the other. They are conventionally considered the boundary between the continents of Europe and Asia. The Turkish Straits have been governed since 1936 by the Montreux Convention.

    • The Bosphorus (also spelled Bosporus; Turkish: Boğaziçi or İstanbul Boğazı, "Istanbul Strait"), about 30 kilometers (19 mi) long and only 700 meters (2,300 ft) wide, connects the Sea of Marmara with the Black Sea in the north. It runs through the city of Istanbul, making it a city located on two continents. It is crossed by two suspension bridges (the Bosphorus Bridge and the Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge) and the Marmaray rail tunnel.

    Turkish Straits The Straits Question


    The Straits have been of urgent maritime strategic importance since the Trojan War was fought near the Aegean entrance. In the declining days of the Ottoman Empire the "Straits Question" involved the diplomats of Europe and the Ottoman Empire.

    By the terms of the London Straits Convention concluded on July 13, 1841, between the Great Powers of EuropeRussia, the United Kingdom, France, Austria and Prussia — the "ancient rule" of the Ottoman Empire was re-established by closing the Turkish straits to all warships whatsoever, barring those of the sultan's allies during wartime. It thus benefited British naval power at the expense of Russian as the latter lacked direct access for its navy to the Mediterranean.[1]

    The treaty is one in a series dealing with access to the Bosphorus, the Sea of Marmara, and the Dardanelles. It evolved from the secret 1833 Treaty of Hünkâr İskelesi (Unkiar Skelessi), in which the Ottoman Empire guaranteed exclusive use of the Straits to "Black Sea Powers" (i.e., Ottoman Empire and Russian Empire) warships in the case of a general war.

    The modern treaty controlling relations is the 1936 Montreux Convention Regarding the Regime of the Turkish Straits, which is still in force. It gives Republic of Turkey control over warships entering the straits but guarantees the free passage of civilian vessels in peacetime.


    Turkish Straits See also



    Turkish Straits References


    1. ^ Christos L. Rozakis (1987). The Turkish Straits. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. pp. 24–25. 

    Coordinates: 40°43′21″N 28°13′29″E / 40.7225°N 28.2247°E / 40.7225; 28.2247



    Dardanelles Straits Black Sea Straits Straits of Bosphorus Bosporus and Dardanelles Straits Dardanelles and Bosporus What Do the Dardanelles Connect Turkish Straits Crisis Turkish Strait Disambig

    | Dardanelles Straits | Black Sea Straits | Straits of Bosphorus | Bosporus and Dardanelles Straits | Dardanelles and Bosporus | What Do the Dardanelles Connect | Turkish Straits Crisis | Turkish Strait Disambig | Turkish_Straits | Turkish_Straits_crisis | List_of_maritime_incidents_in_the_Turkish_Straits | Montreux_Convention_Regarding_the_Regime_of_the_Turkish_Straits | Turkey | Dardanelles_Straits | Black_Sea | Bosphorous_straits | Sea_of_Marmara | Gallipoli | Turkish_Navy | London_Straits_Convention | Greek-Turkish_Assistance_Act_of_1948 | Russian_naval_facility_in_Tartus | Pan-European_Oil_Pipeline | Lodos | Second_Cairo_Conference | Directorate_General_of_Coastal_Safety | Montreux_(disambiguation)

    Copyright:
    Dieser Artikel basiert auf dem Artikel http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_Straits aus der freien Enzyklopaedie http://en.wikipedia.org bzw. http://www.wikipedia.org und steht unter der Doppellizenz GNU-Lizenz fuer freie Dokumentation und Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. In der Wikipedia ist eine Liste der Autoren unter http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Turkish_Straits&action=history verfuegbar. Alle Angaben ohne Gewähr.

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