ULIDIA (KINGDOM)




Cloud:

| Ulidia_(kingdom) | McNulty | Dunleavy | Ulster | Ulaid | Downey_(surname) | Flinn_(surname) | Coulter_(surname) | McGee | Lowery | Doolan | Devaney | Guinness_(surname) | Donlevy | County_Antrim | Lynch_(surname) | McGowan | Garvey | Kelly_(surname) | Cormac_MacDonlevy | MacDunleavy/MacNulty_physicians_of_Tirconnell | Lecale | Dufferin_(barony) | St._Gobhan | East_Breifne | Mourne_(barony) | Lecale_Upper | Castlereagh_(borough) | Kilmacduagh_monastery | St_Goban | Deda_mac_Sin | Carrickfergus_College | Keenaght_(barony) | Ciannachta | Lebor_na_hUidre | Mac_Eoin_Bissett_family | Battle_of_Dunaverty | Carrickfergus | Ulster_Cycle | 7th_century_in_Ireland | List_of_Irish_clans_in_Ulster |



[ Link Deletion Request ]

wikipedia ulidia (kingdom)



Ulidia (kingdom)


The Kingdom of Ulidia, also known as "the lesser Uladh",[1] was that somewhat fluid area of Gaelic Ireland's Ulaidh (province) (L. Ultonia)[2] or its original greater Ulster,[3][4] which remained under rule of the Uladh's or Ulaid's dynasties after the 5th century A.D. encroachments of the Uí Néill. An individual member of the Ulaid nation or the Kingdom of Ulidia was known in Irish as an "Ultach" (variant spellings are "Ultagh" or "Ultaigh"), in Latin as an "Ultonii" and in English as an "Ultonian" or "Ulsterite".[5]


Ulidia (kingdom) Boundaries and ruling houses


This is a map of Gaelic Ireland circa 900 A.D. The map area labelled Ulaid (nation) is the Kingdom of Ulidia.

Located in the extreme southeast of what had been the larger Ulaidh, Ulidia comprised a land area, roughly, contemporaneous with that of modern County Down and the southern portion of County Antrim in Northern Ireland or in modern media usage "Ulster".[6][7][8] County Down, Northern Ireland has an area of 250 square miles. The area of all County Antrim, Northern Ireland would be another 217 square miles.[9]

Prior to the Kingdom’s and the Ulaid Nation's substantial collapse in the late 12th century A.D., Ulidia's interrelated Red Branch ruling houses (I. "Cróeb Ruad" or "red earth" royal houses) were the remaining of the Dál Fiatach group of Ulaid royal dynasties. Prominently at end, these were the O'Hoey (I. O'h Eochadh or O'Heochadha, old name for the MacDonlevy)[10] (parent house),[11] the MacDonlevy (I. "Mac Duinnshléibhe") (descended house) (over-kings of Ulidia), the MacNulty (I. "Mac an Ultaigh", old name for the O'Garvey) (parent house) and the O’Garvey (I. "O'Gairbidh" of Tirowen or Tyrone) (descended house). The O'Garvey kings ruled in Iveagh (I. "Eachach Cobha" or older "Magh Cobha"), the largest of Ulidia's sub-kingdoms, comprising, then, what is today much of the southern and western part of County Down.[12][13][14] These royals of Ulidia were the famed earthen mound building Red Branch knights of Ulster for whom Constance Markievicz, originally, named the Irish patriot organisation "Na Fianna Éireann”.[15]

Other of the principal of these mostly interrelated clanna[16] of Gaelic Ireland's Uldia (kingdom) were the O'Lowry (surname) (sometimes Lynch (surname) or Linch) (I. O'Luingsigh), the MacMahon or McMahon (sometimes O'Mahon) (I. O'Mathghamhna), the O'Hughes (surname) or Clan Hugh (I. Clan Aodha), who's chiefs ruled in the area of modern County Down near its border with modern County Antrim, the Magennis, Mac Guinness or Guinness (surname) (I. Mag Aonghuis), whose chiefs ruled in an area that is comprised now in modern western County Down, the O'Downey (surname) or O'Devaney (I. O'Duibheanaigh), whose chiefs ruled in Cinel Amhalgaidh, now, Clanawley in County Down, the O'Doolan (I. O'Duibhleachain), chiefs of the Clan Breasail in an area near modern Kinelarty now in the modern Barony (Ireland) of Castlereagh, the O'Coulter (surname) (I. O'Coltarain), which chiefs ruled Dal Coirb in the land, that is now the modern Barony (Ireland) of Castlereagh, the O'Flinn, chiefs of the Hy-Tuirtre, a people seated on the east side of the River Bann and Lough Neagh in Antrim, the Mac or McGee of Ulidia (kingdom)'s Island Macgee, the Mac or McGowan or Gowan (from I. "gobha", E. "blacksmith") of the Clanna Rory, who produced several of the over-kings of the Ulaidh and the Kingdom of Ulidia and who were expelled from the former area of Ulidia (kingdom) to Donegal by the English in the late 12th century, and the O'Kelly (surname) of the Clan brasil Mac Coolechan in County Down.[17][18] The McEwen (I. MacEoghain) of Ulster are also descended of the Ulaidh.[19] The Scottish McLachlan (surname) and the Irish McSweeny and McSweeney are descended from Ulidia (kingdom)'s Clan Hugh (I. Aodh) and, thereby, some, also, the Duinnshliebhe/Mac an Ultaigh (Donlevy/McNulty).[20][21] The British House of Stuart is also descended of the dynasties of the Ulaidh.[22]


Ulidia (kingdom) Seat of government, religious center and fall


The burial site of St. Patrick at Dún Phádraig

From their seat at Dún Phádraig or English "Downpatrick" (Latinized "Dunum") in County Down, where the profile of their massive Irish iron age Mound at Down or the earthen defensive works of their fortress at Downpatrick can still to this day be distinguished within the terrain and wherein can be imagined its former huge wooden roundhouse and throne, long halls, dynastic administrative centres, battlements and I. "Cróeb Derg" or "blood red“ trophy room, containing the mounted appendages and severed heads of slain enemies, these last houses of the Dál Fiatach ruled Ulidia for over half a millennia. Downpatrick was from the earliest Irish Christian times of the 5th century A.D. the Dál Fiatach's I. "Rath Celtair" or administrative seat.[23] Downpatrick was also from these earliest Christian times the chief religious site of the Dál Fiatach. It was from 1137 A.D. the See of St. Malachy, then, Bishop of Down and is the sacred 461 A.D. burial site of St. Patrick, who is buried at its ancient Down Cathedral. The Dál Fiatach were the first rulers in Ireland to become Christianized.[24] Claiming descent from Fíatach Finn and through him and the earlier of the Heremon line of kings to Mil Espaine, the legendary 2nd millennium B.C. King of the Celts of Iberian Spain and Portugal (L. Milesius), the ancient Dál Fiatach group of dynasties were a ruling branch of the Ulaid dynasties for at least the some 1200 years from the time of the life of Christ until this sovereign state known Latinized as the Kingdom of Ulidia, which was the last remaining of the patrimony of the Ulaid Nation,[25] substantially, collapsed and, therewith, the entire Ulaid nation, after the Anglo-Norman forces of John de Courcy (aka de Courci) captured Downpatrick upon competing claim of Henry II of England in 1177 A.D.,[26][27] after reported fierce and valiant resistive battle of the Ulidian forces of Rory MacDonlevy (I. MacDuinnshléibhe), the then 54th and last Christian over-king of a viable Uladh (province).[28][29] The over-kingship of the Ulaid (an elected office of its royalty) was restricted to the lineage of the Dál Fiatach's MacDonlevy after 1137 A.D.[30] Even prior to this defeat, King MacLochlainn Donn Sleibhe (d. 1172) had already submitted Ulidia to Henry II of England as a vassalage.[31] The Ulidians under their ruling kings or chiefs The MacDonlevy or var. spell. MacDunleavy, The O'Hoey or var. spell. O'Haughey, The O'Garvey, The McNulty or var. spell. Nolty, et al. unsuccessfully rallied in a fierce attempt to retake Dún Phádraig, a few months after their February 1177 defeat by de Courcy,[32] but the cultural shock of the loss of their sacred site of Dún Phádraig to de Courcy and the English caused the already by then centuries diminished Ulaid race to in short order thereafter cease to exist as a cohesive people.


Ulidia (kingdom) Local aftermath


Ireland in 1300 showing lands held by native Irish (green) and lands held by Normans (pale).

Cu-Ulahd (I. for "Ultonian hound") MacDonlevy, the nephew of Rory MacDonlevy and, then, also, himself, over-king of the Dál Fiatach group of dynasties (a separate over-kingship from that of the over-kingship of the Ulaid nation or Irish Uluti tribe, but, generally, held jointly therewith by the same Gaelic chief, but not in this instance) and other of the Ulidian chiefs commenced a decades long guerrilla campaign against the English occupiers or "foreigners" after de Courcy's victory at Downpatrick. The over- king of the Dál Fiatach was, periodically, throughout their rule, simultaneously, also the over-king of Ulster, but in later times monopolised this latter over kingship. Just some year after Downpatrick, in 1178 A.D., and in reprisal for their depredations at Machaire Conaille, this King Cu-Ulahd MacDonlevy (i.e., dog of Ulidia) fell upon de Courcy and his troops in surprise, while they were encamped at Glenru, and drowned and killed 450 of their 800 numbered, while losing only 100 Irish. Cu-Uladh severely wounded de Courcy, himself, who barely escaped to Dublin with his life. Cu-Ulahd, "the Ulidian dog or hound" was so named because he was said to be as swift in battle against the English as the famed Irish Wolf Hound that the Gaelic chiefs of Ireland brought to battle for successful purpose, including the dismounting of armoured English cavalry.[33] The Ulidian chieftains carried on incessant warfare against the Anglo-Norman de Courcy for at least 20 years from the date of their original 1177 A.D. defeat a Dún Phádraig.[34] As late as 1257 A.D., a MacDonlevy over-king of the Ulaid is recorded as having inflicted “great slaughter” upon the “foreigners”.[35]

Leland notes that generally, though, the English had pacified occupied Ireland’s chieftains within 50 years of Downpatrick. He states that in 1218 A.D. there were only a few rogue Irish chiefs, who were not by then paying tribute to the English crown and that these Chieftains and their reduced nations, generally, lived a meager existence.[36] The very last record of any ruling Ulaid over-king is that of a The MacDonlevy, Captain of his Nation, still in 1273 A.D. seated in the small unconquered regions or patches of the former Kingdom of Ulidia, while, there, then, still also styled in Latin "Rex Hibernicorum Ultoniae" (English "King of the Irish of Ulster").[37]

The embers of this fierce internal resistance to English rule, though, reignited in the late 13th century A.D., after sovereign Gaels began assaults upon the, then, Earldom of Ulster from without. Many of Ulidia's exiled also returned with these still sovereign Gaels, particularly, with the O'Donnell, to war against the Earldom. By the late 14th century A.D., these repeated Gael assaults completely collapsed the English Earldom of Ulster. The resurgent Gael's recaptured the entirety of historic Ulster province, including the area that is now counties Down and Antrim in Northern Ireland, that is the portions, thereof, that were formerly the Kingdom of Ulidia or the final remnants of the Ulaidh (province). The Gaels retained these prizes for hundreds more years until their second later major defeat by the English at Kinsale in 1601, while allied with their royal kindred, the Spanish crown house, and the, subsequent, flight of The O'Donnell, then, Hugh Roe O'Donnell and other Flight of the Earls into exile on the Continent, where they later served as generals in the armies of the Spanish crown and were by him ennobled, some, even, as Grandees of Spain.

In the late 12th century, Henry II of England granted the not thereto English occupied Ulidia as a fiefdom to the Anglo-Norman de Courcy, who thence, as noted hereto, captured and occupied it in predominant measure. Later, in the early 13th century, the succeeding English king John, King of England who was suspicious of de Courcy's ambitions and had a contentious relationship with him, granted the same territory to the also Anglo-Norman Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster, who usurped it from de Courcy and, thereafter, established concurrent therewith the English Earldom of Ulster.[38][39][40]

While no longer then claiming as the “King of the Irish of Ulster”, but, while still pretenders to this title, the Captains of the Donlevy Nation or Chief of the Name remained seated in Ulster, even, after Kinsale, into the late 17th century, where they were involved in various political intrigues. Don-Levi (d. Archbishopric of Trier, also, Treves), a devoted and outspoken Jacobite (Jacobitism), was, thereby, on James II of England's and his French allied's failure to reclaim his British crowns, finally, the last The MacDonlevy to sit in Ireland (departed 1691). He was obliged to quit the country and to follow that fellow Roman Catholic British monarch, James II, a Stuart and therefore Don-Levi's supposed royal Milesian kin, into exile in France, once James II's Jacobite forces and allied French (France's contemporaneously seated King Louis XIV being James II's cousin) were defeated at the Battle of Boyne on 1 July 1690 in an attempt to reclaim James II's English and Scottish crowns. James had earlier been deposed "defacto" as king in England and Scotland, but, not thereto in Ireland, as its Parliament did not also recognise James' having impliedly "abdicated" its throne by tossing the Great Seal of Britain in the Thames river in his 1688 first flight from battle and the British Isles.[41][42][43]


Ulidia (kingdom) Chronology of MacDonlevy or MacDunleavy dynasty over-kings of Ulidia


(See John O'Hart Irish Pedigrees, ibid, Vol. II, 721–722, all dates are anno dominus)

  • Eochaid mac Fiachnai (d. 810)
  • Muiredach mac Eochada 825–839 (anglicised O'Haughey, an older form of MacDonlevy and MacDunleavy)
  • Muiredach mac Eochocáin 893–895
  • Áed mac Eochocáin 898–919
  • Dub Tuinne ("In Torc") mac Eochada 1007-1007
  • Niall mac Eochada 1016–1063
  • Eochaid mac Néill meic Eochada (d. 1062)
  • Donn Sléibe mac Eochada 1071–1078
  • Áed Meranach Ua hEochada 1078–1080
  • Donn Sléibe mac Eochada 1081–1091
  • Donnchad mac Duinn Sléibe 1091–1095 (anglicised Mac Donlevy or Mac Dunleavy) (over-kingship restricted to this over-kings lineage after 1137)
  • Eochaid mac Duinn Sléibe 1095–1099
  • Donnchad mac Duinn Sléibe 1099-1099
  • Eochaid mac Duinn Sléibe 1099–1108
  • Donnchad mac Duinn Sléibe 1108–1113
  • Áed mac Duinn Sléibe 1113–1127
  • Ragnall Ua hEochada 1127–1131
  • Cú Ulad mac Conchobair Chisenaig Mac Duinn Sléibe 1131–1157
  • Áed mac Con Ulad Mac Duinn Sléibe 1157–1158
  • Eochaid mac Con Ulad Mac Duinn Sléibe 1158–1166
  • Magnus mac Con Ulad Mac Duinn Sléibe 1166–1171
  • Donn Sléibe mac Con Ulad Mac Duinn Sléibe 1171–1172
  • Ruaidrí mac Con Ulad Mac Duinn Sléibe 1172–1201 (anglicised Rory MacDonlevy or MacDunleavy, 54th Christian and last king of a viable Ulidia and Uladh nation)
  • Cu-Ulahd Mac Duinn Sléibe (fl. c. 1178) (anglicised Cooley MacDonlevy or MacDunleavy) (appears ruled in periods simultaneous with his uncle Rory at least as over-king of Dál Fiatach group of Uladh dynasties, if not Uladh nation, itself, and so both before and after the substantial collapse of Uladh state and nation)

Ulidia (kingdom) See also



Ulidia (kingdom) References


  1. ^ Dictionary of National Biography Sidney Lee, ed., New York: MacMillan & Co.; London: Smith, Elder & Co. (1893), Vol. 35 Mac Carwell – Maltby, p 52
  2. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  3. ^ Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed., 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica Company, Cambridge, England, p. 569 "Ulster (U'ladh) was one of the early provincial kingdoms of Ireland, formed, according to the legendary chronicles at the Milesian conquest of the island ten centuries before Christ, and given to the descendants of Ir …”
  4. ^ John O'Hart Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (The Line of Ir) p. 299 and (The Line of Heremon), pp. 351 and 355 O’Hart’s chronology differs from the Britannica in that at its page 351 at “37.” it sets the date of establishment of the Ulaid state at 1699 B.C., which has greater coincidence to the date of archeological evidence of an overwhelming 15th century B.C. migration of Iberian Celts to Ireland, but at its page 355 at “72.” O’Hart’s chronology concurs with the Britannica that Ulster province was granted as a kingdom to the descendants of Ir, which prince O’Hart notes at page 299 at “37.” to have been a son of the Iberno-Celt King Milesius of Spain & Portugal, which son did not survive the Milesian or Iberian Celts’ conquest of Ireland but died in a ship sinking before that war vessel reached Ireland.
  5. ^ again, G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  6. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (Principal Families of Ulster) p. 819, (footnote), “Uladh … in after times was confined … to a large territory on the east of Ulster called Ulidia. … and comprised the present county Down with a great portion of Antrim; thus containing in the south and south-east parts of Antrim, the districts along the shores of Lough Neagh and Belfast Lough, Carrickfergus and the peninsula of the Island of Magee in Larne; and thence in line westward to the river Bann. The remaining portion of the county Antrim obtained the name of Dalriada.”
  7. ^ The Encyclopedia of Ireland, B. Lalor and F. McCourt editors, © 2003 New Haven: Yale University Press, p. 1089 ISBN 0-300-09442-6, discussing the rapid diminution of the original territory of Ulahd province, so that for most of the historic existence of the Ulaidh, it consisted only of the extreme Eastern portion of Ulster
  8. ^ The Oxford Companion to Irish History, 2nd ed., S.J. Connolly editor, © 1998, 2002 Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 350–351, ISBN 0-19-866270-X, discussing also the Ulaid dynasties remaining after the 5th century A.D. and their regions of rule therein
  9. ^ Merriam-Webster’s 11th Collegiate Dictionary Springfield: Merriam-Webster’s, Inc. © 2004, pages 1514 and 1533
  10. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), pp 18 and 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  11. ^ John O’Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p. 427
  12. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p. 819 (Principal Families of Ulster), p. 466 (Heremon Genealogies)
  13. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), pp 16, 18 and 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  14. ^ Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker, under section “Migration of the Dunleavys from County Down” noting, also, that some of today’s MacNulty may instead be MacDonlevy royals, who adopted the Mac an Ultaigh (Irish language surname) meaning "descended of the Ulahd" (or at least the Irish nickname surname "Ultaigh", that is Ulidian) in the middle ages after emigrating from Ulidia following its fall. The article also notes that, otherwise, the clanna MacNulty/O'Garvey is unique from the clanna Hoey/MacDonlevy. See this notes source and article links for further detail.
  15. ^ War of Independence online archive, © 2011, Article about the foundation of Na Fianna Eireann – The Irish National Boy Scouts by the late Donnchadh Ó Shea.
  16. ^ 4th MacEachen's Gaelic-English Dictionary, Inverness, The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, 1922, p. 90, pl., literally, "offspring"
  17. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p 311-312, 819- 820, 872
  18. ^ Dictionary of American Family Names, P. Hanks ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press (2003) Vol. 2 G-N pp. 554–555 ISBN 0-19-508137-4 (Vol. 2) for detail on McGuinness, including variants
  19. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p 604
  20. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, pp 558–559
  21. ^ Iain Moncreiffe of that Ilk The Highland Clans (1982) New York: Clarkson N. Potter ISBN 0-517-546580, pp. 117–119, The Donlevy are also reputed to have given rise in Scotland to the Highland MacEwens, Maclachlans, MacNeils and MacSweens.
  22. ^ again, G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy) “From the chiefs of the Dalriadians were descended the ancient Scottish kings and also the House of Stuart.”
  23. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 355
  24. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (Heremon Genealogies) (Dunlevy, Princes of Ulidia.) p. 427 at 92. and (Principal Families of Ulster) p. 819 (footnote), “Ulidia is remarkable as the scene of St. Patrick’s early captivity (it being there that he was sold as a slave to a chieftain named Milcho, whose flocks he tended near Mis mountain) and is celebrated as the place where he made the first converts to Christianity; and finally as the place of his death and burial. He died at Sabhal, afterward the parish of “Saul;” and was buried at the cathedral at Dune, which in consequence was called Dunepatrick or Downpatrick.”
  25. ^ Again, John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (Principal Families of Ulster) p. 819 (footnote)
  26. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, pp. 351, noting Henry II also claimed by right of Milesian lineage
  27. ^ John de Courci Encyclopædia Britannica
  28. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 355
  29. ^ See, also, John O’Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p. 428
  30. ^ Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High Kings, Four Courts Press, 2001, p. 128, “So for instance when after 1137 the Dal Fiatach kingship was confined to the descendants of Donn Sleibe Mac Eochada (slain in 1091), the rigdamnai set themselves apart from the rest of the family by using the name Mac Duinnshleibhe (Donleavy).”
  31. ^ The Oxford Companion to Irish History, 2nd ed., S.J. Connolly, ed., Oxford: Oxford University Press © 1998, 2002, ISBN 0-19-866270-X, pp. 350–351
  32. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 17 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  33. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), pp 17–18, 25, 27–28, 32, 38, 40 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  34. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 19 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  35. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 41 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  36. ^ Thomas Leland History of Ireland from the Time of Henry II, in 3 volumes, Dublin: 1773, Vol. 1, p 214
  37. ^ again, The Oxford Companion to Irish History, 2nd , S.J. Connolly, ed., Oxford: Oxford University Press ©1998, 2002 ISBN 0-19-866270-X, pp 350–351, citing to this over-king’s attested letter of support for William FitzWarrin, a seneschal of Ulster
  38. ^ John de Courci Encyclopædia Britannica
  39. ^ Abbe MacGeohegan History of Ireland New York: D.J. Sandlier (1853) pp 267–288 Patrick Kelly, trans.
  40. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), Part 1, p VIII (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  41. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (Heremon Genealogies), (Don-Levi pedigree), pp. 417, 418, 428, noting also that Don-Levi is the Gallic form of MacDunshleibhe and that while in exile on the European continent, some of these MacDonlevy later married into the Russian aristocracy. Notable among this small Russo-Gallic line of the MacDonlevy are Andrew Maurice Don-Levi (d. 1751 at Coblentz), the son of Prince Don-Levi (d. Archbishopric of Trier or Treves) and, Andrew Maurice, himself, the Lt. Governor of Treves, the Rev. Father Andrew Donlevy (d. after 1764), Paris based author of the Catechism of the Christian Doctrine
  42. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), Part 1, p VIII (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy) There was also a Paul Don Levy, prince of Russian Poland.
  43. ^ Fitzpatrick, Brendan, New Gill History of Ireland 3: Seventeenth-Century Ireland – The War of Religions (Dublin, 1988), page 253 ISBN 0-7171-1626-3; Szechi, Daniel (1994). The Jacobites, Britain and Europe, 1688–1788. 48: Manchester University Press. ISBN 0-7190-3774-3 , also, noting that James II’s other Irish supporters, who unlike Prince Don-Levi, he left abandoned in Ireland, thence, having no legal authority to depose James II, who claimed rule by divine right, as their king, gave James a new Irish language title, that is “Se’amus an Chaca” (or in English “James the Turd”).

Ulidia (kingdom) External links




| Ulidia_(kingdom) | McNulty | Dunleavy | Ulster | Ulaid | Downey_(surname) | Flinn_(surname) | Coulter_(surname) | McGee | Lowery | Doolan | Devaney | Guinness_(surname) | Donlevy | County_Antrim | Lynch_(surname) | McGowan | Garvey | Kelly_(surname) | Cormac_MacDonlevy | MacDunleavy/MacNulty_physicians_of_Tirconnell | Lecale | Dufferin_(barony) | St._Gobhan | East_Breifne | Mourne_(barony) | Lecale_Upper | Castlereagh_(borough) | Kilmacduagh_monastery | St_Goban | Deda_mac_Sin | Carrickfergus_College | Keenaght_(barony) | Ciannachta | Lebor_na_hUidre | Mac_Eoin_Bissett_family | Battle_of_Dunaverty | Carrickfergus | Ulster_Cycle | 7th_century_in_Ireland | List_of_Irish_clans_in_Ulster

Copyright:
Dieser Artikel basiert auf dem Artikel http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulidia_(kingdom) aus der freien Enzyklopaedie http://en.wikipedia.org bzw. http://www.wikipedia.org und steht unter der Doppellizenz GNU-Lizenz fuer freie Dokumentation und Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. In der Wikipedia ist eine Liste der Autoren unter http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ulidia_(kingdom)&action=history verfuegbar. Alle Angaben ohne Gewähr.

Dieser Artikel enthält u.U. Inhalte aus dmoz.org : Help build the largest human-edited directory on the web. Suggest a Site - Open Directory Project - Become an Editor






Search: deutsch english español français русский

| deutsch | english | español | français | русский |




[ Privacy Policy ] [ Link Deletion Request ] [ Imprint ]